Category: Photoshoots

Gallery: Additions to Two 2018 Photoshoots

 

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  • Photoshoots > 2018 > 001  +20
  • Photoshoots > 2018 > 008 +6

 

Press/Gallery: Lauren Cohan On Life After Zombies — And Why We May Still See Maggie Again


 

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  • Photoshoots > 2018 > 009

 

BUSTLE – As Maggie on The Walking Dead, Lauren Cohan kicks some serious butt. And just like her character, Cohan has come a long way since those days on the Greene family farm. She currently stars opposite Mark Wahlberg in the action-packed film Mile 22 as the fearless CIA operative Alice, and is also set to play a CIA agent in the spy dramedy Whiskey Cavalier when it comes to ABC in 2019. But despite the fact that her time on The Walking Dead is soon coming to an end (she’ll appear only in the first half of Season 9), Cohan isn’t concerned about what she’ll be doing when she’s no longer killing zombies on AMC. As she explains to Bustle, she’s always been pragmatic when it comes to her career, and she’s excited for what’s ahead.

When the British-American Cohan walks into the Bustle offices on a muggy New York City summer day, she exudes the sincere approachability that charmed Glenn Rhee and audiences alike back in Season 2 of The Walking Dead. She is far removed from the worlds of the zombie apocalypse and black ops missions here, but it’s easy to see why she often plays leaders worthy of following. And her portrayals of female leadership seem particularly significant in the current social climate.

Starting all the way back when she played con artist Bela in Supernatural, Cohan says she has never been limited by expectations people may have about female characters. “I can’t help but not be constricted by the stereotypes,” she says. However, she’s guarded when it comes to speaking on behalf of all women in the entertainment industry, preferring instead to focus on her own experiences. While she notes that she’s “glad that we’re in a time where light is being shown” on gender inequality, she’s personally drawn to roles that she feels accurately portray the human condition in general.

“Take Maggie in The Walking Dead, as well as [Alice] in Mile 22,” Cohan says. “Alice is at the top of her class. She’s able to be in a situation, assess what needs to be done, and either know already or learn how to navigate very, very complex and life-threatening situations. That doesn’t sound like a gender-specific thing to me. That sounds like something a human being has the impetus or desire to do.”

Cohan notes that she’s prone to being “completely over-analytical,” which could explain her cautiousness when it comes to speaking in generalities. This leads her to be extremely thoughtful and measured when it comes to seeing the whole picture. It’s also helped her navigate the waters of being known for a particular character for the last eight seasons while trying to plan for her post-Walking Dead future.

Though Cohan has been giving most of her time and attention to her role as Maggie, she has appeared in other projects during her Walking Dead tenure. She starred in the 2016 horror film The Boy, played Bruce Wayne’s mom in Batman v Superman: Dawn Of Justice, and portrayed Tupac Shakur’s mentor in the biopic All Eyez On Me alongside fellow Walking Dead star Danai Gurira.

Mile 22 is Cohan’s first major film role since The Boy, and her character Alice may remind Walking Dead fans of Maggie: She’s a competent leader who is struggling to balance the responsibilities of being a mother with what Cohan calls “a potential world crisis of atom-bomb proportions.” And Cohan doesn’t hesitate to draw parallels between her characters.

“The physical pressures of these environments in Walking Dead and in Mile 22 help become a pressure cooker for the emotion of said character. So with Alice in Mile 22, she is at this juncture of maybe wanting to be done with this life because it’s compromising having a normal life and having a relationship with her daughter,” Cohan says. “So she has a great responsibility to that and there’s [an] immense push and pull of career and motherhood. It’s almost impossible for her to leave, to choose one over the other, and it brings people — as I would imagine — to a great breaking point.”
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Gallery: San Diego Comic Con 2018 – More Portraits

 

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  • Photoshoots > 2018 > 003
  • Photoshoots > 2018 > 004

 

 

Gallery: San Diego Comic Con 2018 – IMDb Yacht

 

 

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Gallery: San Diego Comic Con 2018 – “The Walking Dead” Photocall & Pizza Hut Lounge

 

 

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Gallery: Exclusive Additions to 2014 Photoshoot

These are some exclusive outtakes I got from a 2014 photoshoot of Lauren and Steven Yeun. I’m hoping to get the rest of them and some more exclusive outtakes if I can. If anyone would like to contribute to things like this, there is a donation button the sidebar.

 

 

 

Gallery Link:

  • Photoshoots > 2014 > 001

 

Press: The Walking Dead’s Lauren Cohan Is Set on Survival

 
 

INTERVIEW MAGAZINE – It’s war on The Walking Dead. And if we’ve learned anything over the show’s seven seasons, casualties will mount and, quite literally, everything’s at stake when the AMC drama returns for its 100th episode and season eight premiere this Sunday. In a post-apocalyptic, brutal world full of walkers, opposing groups fight for survival, control, independence, and, depending on whom you ask, “the greater good.” Some existential questions ensue: What does it take to endure? And what will be sacrificed along the way?

 

According to Lauren Cohan, the British-American actress who’s played Maggie Greene since the second season, the key to her character’s perseverance is simple: heart. “Heart as in spirit,” explains Cohan. “The ability to communicate and to inspire people to fight, inspire people to love, inspire people be vulnerable even when you’ve been hurt or bashed or crushed … She’s able to let people in even when she’s completely emotionally destroyed.”

 

Maggie has experienced more than her fair share of loss: an incomplete list of departed loved ones includes her father Hershel (Scott Wilson) and sister Beth (Emily Kinney); her husband Glenn (Steven Yeun), who met his end at the hands of Negan (Jeffrey Dean Morgan), leaving Maggie alone while pregnant with their child; and, most recently, her friend Sasha (Sonequa Martin-Green), who closed season seven with an act of self-sacrifice, swallowing a poison pill in defiance of Negan. Despite it all, Maggie remains a leader and beacon of resolve.

 

HALEY WEISS: I read about the death dinners you have when cast are killed off of the show, and that you were responsible for bringing a karaoke machine into the picture when Steven Yeun and Michael Cudlitz left. Is that true?

 

LAUREN COHAN: You know what, it was Danai [Gurira]’s idea; I just made the phone call. We always have these death dinners, and we’ve obviously had so many people leave now. We still have the really sad part of the night where everyone sort of says their goodbyes, but Danai had this great idea to liven it up for the second part. We finished the night singing Backstreet Boys karaoke and everything else cheesy you can imagine. Steven was the first who we had the idea to do that for, because he really is such a karaoke king—I don’t know if he’s karaoke king, he’ll kill me if I say that—but he’s a really good singer. And he’s very sentimental, so we sang a bunch of ridiculous stuff. That night we did a tribute; we started it off with Backstreet Boys, and we all dressed as the Backstreet Boys [combined] with [Cudlitz’s character] Abraham—we had all white on and ginger mustaches. Everybody was sitting and eating barbecue, and all the girls filed out and did this dedication to Steven. It was really good. We cried and laughed.

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Press/Video: “The Walking Dead” marks 100 episodes with 3 celebratory EW covers

 

EW – The best piece of advice to anyone visiting the set of The Walking Dead in season 8? Bring earplugs. That’s because there is more stuff being shot off and blown up than ever before.

 

That’s right, the wait is over. The war between Rick and Negan has finally begun, and Entertainment Weekly has been down to the Senoia, Georgia, set to witness it with our own eyes and ears… at least what’s left of them. We’ve got all the on-the-scene scoop in our latest Walking Dead cover story, complete with three different covers (see below).

 

We spoke to all 20 members of the cast as well as the producers who make the show, and they all used the exact same word when asked about season 8: action. “It’s a f —ing in-your-face action-packed IV of adrenaline,” says Austin Amelio, who plays Dwight. “Season 7 was the ramp-up and now this is the blastoff. The stuff that’s happening is insane!”

 

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Gallery: Glamour x Tory Burch Women To Watch Lunch & Photoshoot Additions

I’ve added some beautiful new photos from 2016 San Diego Comic Con Entertainment Weekly’s photoshoot as well as a Glamour party.

 

 

 

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Lauren Cohan is Still Standing (For Now)

The ‘Walking Dead’ actress opens up about season seven’s “heartbreaking” finale, her last “death dinner” with Steven Yeun—and what women know about surviving the apocalypse.

 

If you think the real world has gone to hell, we invite you to take a tour of the world as depicted in television’s favorite zombie apocalypse. The seventh season of AMC’s The Walking Dead has been grim—and that’s saying something for a world where hordes of the undead are basically set dressing. Chalk it up to the addition of the show’s biggest, baddest Big Bad ever: the sinister survivor Negan, played by a gleefully sadistic Jeffrey Dean Morgan. Negan puts a fine point on an oft-central question of the series—one we’ve asked ourselves, oh, a couple of times since novelist Mary Shelley first conjured up Frankenstein: “So who’s the real monster here, anyway?” The answer he poses with relentless, cavalier brutality isn’t “us, but…” or “us, if….” It’s a grinning, “us, duh.”

 

But Lauren Cohan doesn’t view things that way. The actress has a skill for seeing the sunny side, even if she has to squint. On a cloudy day up in the Santa Monica Mountains, where Cohan is being photographed for BAZAAR.com, she’s the picture of placid poise in a gold and black Louis Vuitton dress. “I’m in the mind of another version of myself, which can be very steadying,” she says of wearing the shoot’s playfully sculptural outfits. This idea of steadiness is a quality Cohan tries to actualize in her character, Maggie. If the Southern farm girl-turned-fighter Cohan plays on The Walking Dead has remained a figure of stability since she first appeared in the show’s second season, it’s because Cohan sees Maggie as the eye in a storm. As the show’s survivors run from place to place, beating back threat after escalating threat, Maggie has become a touchstone for humanity and pragmatism in an increasingly ruthless narrative.

 

The ability to project such reliability comes from Cohan’s own itinerant childhood—the now 35-year-old was born in New Jersey, spent a year in Georgia, returned to New Jersey, then moved with her family to the UK as a teenager. The English accent stuck, and so did an aptitude for laying down roots in new soil. “It’s interesting for me to play to a hopeful feeling in the middle of tragedy,” says Cohan. More than perhaps any other character in the series, Maggie has seen tragedy not at the hands of flesh-eating zombies, but of flesh-and-blood humans. A recap, not for the faint of heart: her father is decapitated by the power-mad “Governor” of another group of survivors; her younger sister is accidentally shot dead by yet another wannabe despot; and her husband Glenn (played by fan favorite Steven Yeun) had his skull treated like silly putty by a baseball bat-wielding Negan in this season’s gruesome and controversial premiere. So what was that about hope?

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